Amazon confirms annual Prime Day sale will be Oct. 13-14 .

  Holiday shopping season is getting a big head start this year. Amazon  today announced that it will hold Prime Day — its annual mega global sale event on a big range of items, including toys, TVs, electronics, fashion, beauty, kitchen, home, and Amazon Devices — on Tuesday, October 13 (midnight PT) and carrying on through Wednesday, October 14, just weeks ahead of Black Friday. Prime Day will take place in the U.S., U.K, U.A.E, Spain, Singapore, Netherlands, Mexico, Luxembourg, Japan, Italy, Germany, France, China, Canada, Belgium, Austria, Australia, and (for the first time) Turkey and Brazil.







Prime Day, as its name implies, is a sale aimed that people who are members of Amazon’s Prime loyalty program, which provides free shipping on a big range of items, access to Amazon’s various streamed media services, and other perks, for a monthly or annual fee. There are some 150 million+ people globally who now take out Prime memberships and Amazon offers free trials for people to sign up so that they can buy during the two-day event. 




(Pricing for Prime starts at $119 a year or $12.99 a month for individuals, with discounts for students, those on government assistance and others. Business Prime for businesses starts at $69 per year.)




The event, which is still called “Prime Day” even though it has grown over time to 48 hours, is usually held over the summer as a way of boosting buying activity in what can otherwise be more sluggish shopping months — 2019’s event was in July — but this year, it was postponed because of COVID-19.




That was likely due to multiple reasons. Given that the virus was peaking in the US this summer, having a big sales event might have been a bad look. But in addition to that, the economic impact of the virus has also taken a toll: for many budgets have tightened, and so if consumers are going to take the time to buy big-ticket items, Amazon is possibly banking on them doing that only once this year, during holiday shopping, rather than twice.




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